Telecommunications for the Parker Solar Probe

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The NASA Parker Solar Probe launched on August 12, 2018, beginning its historic mission to study the dynamics of the Solar corona. The Parker Solar Probe will execute 24 orbits over the next 7 years, ultimately passing within 7 million km of the Sun’s surface. The mission will provide in situ measurements to better understand the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind.

 

This talk will present the telecommunications system for the Parker Solar Probe.  This system is responsible for all communications between Earth and the spacecraft, as well as the precise range and velocity measurements used for orbit determination.  The exacting concerns of this mission place unique constraints on the design of the spacecraft telecommunications hardware.  Likewise, the mission link planning must account for the effects of the solar environment and the constantly changing relationship between the spacecraft, the Earth and the Sun.



  Date and Time

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  • 1745 West Nursery Road
  • Linthicum, Maryland
  • United States 21090
  • Building: National Electronics Museum
  • Room Number: Pioneer Hall

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=39.1957917%2c 76
  • Starts 01 February 2019 12:55 PM
  • Ends 19 February 2019 04:00 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

David Copeland of Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

Topic:

Telecommunications for the Parker Solar Probe

The NASA Parker Solar Probe launched on August 12, 2018, beginning its historic mission to study the dynamics of the Solar corona. The Parker Solar Probe will execute 24 orbits over the next 7 years, ultimately passing within 7 million km of the Sun’s surface. The mission will provide in situ measurements to better understand the heating of the solar corona and the acceleration of the solar wind.

 

This talk will present the telecommunications system for the Parker Solar Probe.  This system is responsible for all communications between Earth and the spacecraft, as well as the precise range and velocity measurements used for orbit determination.  The exacting concerns of this mission place unique constraints on the design of the spacecraft telecommunications hardware.  Likewise, the mission link planning must account for the effects of the solar environment and the constantly changing relationship between the spacecraft, the Earth and the Sun.

Biography:

David Copeland (Member, IEEE) is a member of the Principal Professional Staff with the RF Group in the Space Exploration Sector at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. He is currently the lead engineer for the telecommunications subsystem for NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission.  Mr. Copeland has over 30 years’ experience in microwave and optical communications systems. He received his B.S. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1985 and M.S. from the University of Maryland in 1997, both in electrical engineering.





Agenda

5:30 p.m. Social time and snack

6:00 p.m. presentation