BrillianSe – Development and applications of the world’s highest spatial resolution direct conversion X-ray detector

Share

IEEE EDS DL Talk 


When conventional x-ray radiography presents inadequate absorption-contrast especially in low density materials, higher sensitivity can be achieved using phase-contrast methods. The implementation of phase-contrast x-ray imaging using propagation-based techniques requires stringent spatial resolution requirements that necessitate lengthy propagation distances and inefficient scintillator-based detectors limiting experimentation only at synchrotrons.

 

This work describes the more than a decade long development of a now commercially available hybrid direct X-ray conversion amorphous selenium and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector technology called BrillianSe that offers a unique combination of high spatial resolution (8 micron pixel pitch) and quantum efficiency for hard x-rays to enable benchtop phase contrast micro-CT systems.

 

In this talk, the semiconductor fabrication process developed for large area compatible vertical detector integration by back-end processing is described along with characterization of signal and noise performance using Fourier-based methods of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency using radiography and microfocus x-ray sources.

 

The measured spatial resolution at each stage of detector development was one of the highest, if not the highest reported for hard x-rays (> 20 keV). In fact, charge carrier spreading from x-ray interactions with amorphous selenium was shown physically larger than the pixel pitch for the first time.

 

Lastly, fast (5 fps) propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray and micro-CT imaging in compact geometries (< 20 cm Source Detector distances) is demonstrated using a conventional low power microfocus source at 4W for the first time. The phase-contrast technique is applied to a number of samples including 3D semiconductors, flex electronics, Mini-LEDS, 3D printed composite materials (e.g. Kevlar), low density building materials, and even biological mouse organs, seeds, and insects where radiation dose must be minimized.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



Virtual Online Zoom Meeting

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86048150132

Meeting ID: 860 4815 0132
Password: 746035
Join by Phone
+13126266799 USA
+16465588656, USA 
 

  • Virtual Online Zoom Meeting
  • Location:Please register at IEEE vTools
  • Global Webinar
  • Canada
  • Dr. Ajay K. Poddar, Eamil: akpoddar@ieee.org

    Prof. Edip Niver, Email: edip.niver@njit.edu

    Prof. Durga Misra, Email: dmisra@njit.edu

    Dr. Anisha M. Apte, Email: anisha_apte@ieee.org

    Naresh Chand, Email: chandnaresh@gmail.com

     

  • Co-sponsored by IEEE North Jersey ED/CAS, MTT/AP & Photonics Chapters
  • Starts 21 September 2020 10:22 PM
  • Ends 14 October 2020 06:45 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Prof. Karim Karim
Prof. Karim Karim of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, CANADA

Topic:

BrillianSe – Development and applications of the world’s highest spatial resolution direct conversion X-ray detector

When conventional x-ray radiography presents inadequate absorption-contrast especially in low density materials, higher sensitivity can be achieved using phase-contrast methods. The implementation of phase-contrast x-ray imaging using propagation-based techniques requires stringent spatial resolution requirements that necessitate lengthy propagation distances and inefficient scintillator-based detectors limiting experimentation only at synchrotrons.

 

This work describes the more than a decade long development of a now commercially available hybrid direct X-ray conversion amorphous selenium and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector technology called BrillianSe that offers a unique combination of high spatial resolution (8 micron pixel pitch) and quantum efficiency for hard x-rays to enable benchtop phase contrast micro-CT systems.

 

In this talk, the semiconductor fabrication process developed for large area compatible vertical detector integration by back-end processing is described along with characterization of signal and noise performance using Fourier-based methods of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency using radiography and microfocus x-ray sources.

 

The measured spatial resolution at each stage of detector development was one of the highest, if not the highest reported for hard x-rays (> 20 keV). In fact, charge carrier spreading from x-ray interactions with amorphous selenium was shown physically larger than the pixel pitch for the first time.

 

Lastly, fast (5 fps) propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray and micro-CT imaging in compact geometries (< 20 cm Source Detector distances) is demonstrated using a conventional low power microfocus source at 4W for the first time. The phase-contrast technique is applied to a number of samples including 3D semiconductors, flex electronics, Mini-LEDS, 3D printed composite materials (e.g. Kevlar), low density building materials, and even biological mouse organs, seeds, and insects where radiation dose must be minimized.

Biography:

Karim S. Karim received his BASc and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Waterloo, and an MBA in Health Sector Management from the University of Toronto. He is currently the Chief Technology Officer of KA Imaging, the Executive Director for the Center for Bioengineering and Biotechnology and a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo. Since 1998, Karim has developed novel X-ray imaging devices and methods. He has trained over 40 PhD and MASc students, has co-authored 250+ publications and has 50+ patents. Karim has supported multiple startups and founded multiple companies in the past two decades including KA Imaging, a University of Waterloo spinoff that is commercializing his X-ray research including Reveal, the world’s only portable dual energy spectral X-ray detector that recently received US FDA 510(k) clearance and is now being used clinically in North America to detect lung cancer and pneumonia (including COVID-19) with higher sensitivity than conventional X-rays. Some of the imaging circuit technology developed during Karim’s graduate work is also now used in ultrasonic fingerprint sensors in commercial mobile phones and tablets.

Email:

Address:Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1





Agenda

  • Date: 14 October 2020
  • Time: 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
  • Join Zoom Meeting
    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/9514547039

    Meeting ID: 951 454 7039 Passcode: 999487
  •  


Co-sponsored by IEEE North Jersey ED/CAS, MTT/AP &  Photonics Joint Chapters