DNA Origami Nanoarchitectures for Spatially-Oriented Macromolecular Organization

Share

Please register to receive WebEx information the day prior to the event.


Scaffolded DNA origami nanoparticles (DNA-NPs) have enabled synthesis of biomimetic 
nanoarchitectures that mimic natural protein assemblies such as toxins and viruses with high 
structural fidelity. Unlike other types of synthetic self-assembled materials, these DNA-NPs can 
be designed to any prescribed shape and size. In addition, these DNA-NPs can be easily modified 
to precisely organize biomolecules with an unprecedented control over their stoichiometry and 
spatial organization. These nanoparticles have enabled the development of biomimetic system 
such as viral like nanoparticles mimics, bio-inspired light harvesting system, and enzymatic 
cascade reconstitution among others. In this talk, I will introduce our approach to design and 
assemble 3D DNA nanostructures that can be utilized as a platform to precisely organize organic 
and inorganic molecule assemblies at the nanometer scale. Next, I will presents results validating
the controlled 3D arrangement of proteins, which enabled an investigation of the role of viral 
proteins nanoscale organization on immune cell receptor toward efficient vaccine platform 
development. Then I will demonstrate the capacity of scaffolded DNA building blocks to organize 
strongly interacting cyanine aggregates in order to construct fast, coherent energy transfer in 
complex supramolecular architectures. This approach may enable design of nanoscale excitonic 
circuit in large 2D and 3D DNA-based arrays.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Date: 19 Aug 2021
  • Time: 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • Add_To_Calendar_icon Add Event to Calendar

Virtual

  • United States

  • fennigcg@icloud.com

  • Co-sponsored by EMBS
  • Starts 26 July 2021 07:34 PM
  • Ends 18 August 2021 05:00 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Dr. Remi Veneziano

Topic:

DNA Origami Nanoarchitectures for Spatially-Oriented Macromolecular Organization

Scaffolded DNA origami nanoparticles (DNA-NPs) have enabled synthesis of biomimetic 
nanoarchitectures that mimic natural protein assemblies such as toxins and viruses with high 
structural fidelity. Unlike other types of synthetic self-assembled materials, these DNA-NPs can 
be designed to any prescribed shape and size. In addition, these DNA-NPs can be easily modified 
to precisely organize biomolecules with an unprecedented control over their stoichiometry and 
spatial organization. These nanoparticles have enabled the development of biomimetic system 
such as viral like nanoparticles mimics, bio-inspired light harvesting system, and enzymatic 
cascade reconstitution among others. In this talk, I will introduce our approach to design and 
assemble 3D DNA nanostructures that can be utilized as a platform to precisely organize organic 
and inorganic molecule assemblies at the nanometer scale. Next, I will presents results validating
the controlled 3D arrangement of proteins, which enabled an investigation of the role of viral 
proteins nanoscale organization on immune cell receptor toward efficient vaccine platform 
development. Then I will demonstrate the capacity of scaffolded DNA building blocks to organize 
strongly interacting cyanine aggregates in order to construct fast, coherent energy transfer in 
complex supramolecular architectures. This approach may enable design of nanoscale excitonic 
circuit in large 2D and 3D DNA-based arrays.

Biography:

Remi Veneziano joined the department of Bioengineering at George Mason University in the Fall 
of 2018 with the objective of developing a highly translational-research program focusing on using 
DNA nanotechnology for biomedical applications including targeted delivery of biologics (RNA, 
proteins), vaccine platform development, biophysical characterization of DNA nanoparticles 
interaction with lipid bilayer membranes, and synthesis of new composite biomaterials. Prior to 
this position, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at MIT under the supervision of Pr. Mark Bathe, 
where he worked on various aspect of DNA nanotechnology including the development of a new 
type of 3D wireframe DNA nanoparticles. He also designed DNA-nanoparticles for HIV antigens 
presentation with the aim of understanding the relation between nanoscale organization of antigens 
and immune response.

Address:Department of Bioengineering, George Mason University, Volgenau School of Engineering, Fairfax, United States, 22030