"A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone."

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Dr. Frederick P. Brooks Jr., Kenan Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will give a presentation on the history of computing titled "A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone." This presentation is jointly sponsored by the IEEE Eastern North Carolina Section, as part of its 50th anniversary celebration, and by the North Carolina State University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Distinguished Speaker Series.

 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration



  • 1070 Partners Way
  • NCSU Centennial Campus
  • Raleigh, North Carolina
  • United States 27606
  • Building: James B. Hunt Jr Library
  • Room Number: Auditorium
  • Click here for Map

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=35.7795897%2c 78
  • Heather Daughtridge <hmdaught@ncsu.edu>

  • Co-sponsored by NCSU Distinguished Speaker Series
  • Starts 23 August 2015 02:00 PM
  • Ends 30 September 2015 05:00 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Fred Brooks

Fred Brooks of University of North Carolina

Topic:

"A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone."

Dr. Frederick P. Brooks Jr., Kenan Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will give a presentation on the history of computing titled "A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone." This presentation is jointly sponsored by the IEEE Eastern North Carolina Section, as part of its 50th anniversary celebration, and by the North Carolina State University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Distinguished Speaker Series.

Biography:

Frederick {“Fred”) Brooks, the developer of the IBM 360 mainframe computer systems architecture and noted engineering author, was born in Durham, North Carolina, on April 19, 1931. He earned a BS degree in Physics from Duke University in 1953, and a PhD in Applied Mathematics (Computer Science) from Harvard in 1956. He joined IBM in 1956, and began working on systems architecture for the emerging mainframe computer business, in the course of which he basically invented the field of computer architecture. When asked what his greatest technological achievement was, Brooks replied that “The most important single decision I ever made was to change the IBM 360 series from a 6-bit byte to an 8-bit byte, thereby enabling the use of lowercase letters. That change propagated everywhere.”

In 1964, Brooks joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina and created its Computer Science department. He continues to pursue active research in the fields of virtual reality and scientific visualization. He is the author of many books and papers, including The Mythical Man-Month, No Silver Bullet, and the Design of Design. He was named an IEEE Fellow in 1968, and a member of the National Academy of Science in 2001. His many awards include the A.W. Turing Award (1999) and the Eckert-Mauchly Award (2004).[1]

 

[1] “Fred brooks,” Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Brooks

Email:

Address:Brooks Computer Science Building, CB #3175, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States, 27599-3175

Fred Brooks of University of North Carolina

Topic:

"A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone."

Biography:

Email:

Address:Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States





Agenda

6:00-6:30 - social networking
6:30 - Welcome and Introduction
6:35-7:30 - Dr. Fred Brooks presentation, "A Personal History of Computation—Babbage to iPhone."
7:30-8:00 - Audience Q&A, followed by reception in EBII Room 3002