Low Phase Noise Signal Generation utilizing Oscillators, Resonators & Filters and Atomic

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Low Phase Noise Signal Generation utilizing Oscillators, Resonators & Filters and Atomic Clocks (MTT-14 and MTT-22)
Distinguished Microwave Lecturer - Dr. Jeremy Everard,
Professor of ElectronicsDepartment of Electronic Engineering, University of York Heslington, York, YO10-5DD, UK.Email: jeremy.everard@york.ac.uk


This talk will discuss the theory and design of a wide variety of oscillators offering the very best performance. Typically, this is achieved by splitting the oscillator design into its component parts and developing new amplifiers, resonators and phase shifters which offer high Q, high power handling and low thermal and transposed flicker noise.
Key features of oscillators offering the lowest phase noise available will be shown, for example: a 1.25GHz DRO produces -173dBc/Hz at 10kHz offset and a noise floor of -186dB and a 10 MHz crystal oscillator shows -123dBc/Hz at 1Hz and -149 at 10Hz.
New compact atomic clocks with ultra-low phase noise microwave synthesiser chains (with micro Hz resolution) will also be briefly described to demonstrate how the long-term stability can be improved.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Contact

  Registration



  • 2350 Broad Hollow Road
  • Farmingdale, New York
  • United States 11735
  • Building: Lupton Hall
  • Room Number: T101

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=40.7527778%2c 73
  • Saikumar Padmanabhan (mtt@ieee.li), Chair,IEEE Long Island Section
    Adam A. Filios (photonics@ieee.li) , Chair, Photonics Society, IEEE Long Island Section
    Bryan Tropper (ap@ieee.li) , Chair, Antennas and Propagation Society, IEEE Long Island Section

  • Co-sponsored by The Photonics Society & Antennas & Propogation Society Long Island Section
  • Starts 17 August 2018 09:33 AM
  • Ends 14 September 2018 06:33 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Jeremy Everard of Department of Electronic Engineering, University of York

Topic:

Low Phase Noise Signal Generation utilizing Oscillators, Resonators & Filters and Atomic Clocks (MTT-14 and MTT-22)

This talk will discuss the theory and design of a wide variety of oscillators offering the very best performance. Typically, this is achieved by splitting the oscillator design into its component parts and developing new amplifiers, resonators and phase shifters which offer high Q, high power handling and low thermal and transposed flicker noise.
Key features of oscillators offering the lowest phase noise available will be shown, for example: a 1.25GHz DRO produces -173dBc/Hz at 10kHz offset and a noise floor of -186dB and a 10 MHz crystal oscillator shows -123dBc/Hz at 1Hz and -149 at 10Hz.
New compact atomic clocks with ultra-low phase noise microwave synthesiser chains (with micro Hz resolution) will also be briefly described to demonstrate how the long-term stability can be improved.

Biography:

Jeremy Everard obtained his degrees from King’s College London and the University of Cambridge, UK in 1976 and 1983 respectively. He worked for six years in industry at GEC Marconi Research Laboratories, M/A-Com and Philips Research Laboratories on Radio and Microwave circuit design. At Philips he ran the Radio Transmitter Project Group.
He then taught at King's College London for nine years and became full Professor of Electronics at the University of York in September 1993. He has taught analogue IC design, optoelectronics, filter design, Electromagnetism and RF & microwave circuit design. In September 2007, he was awarded a five-year research chair in Low Phase Noise Signal Generation sponsored by BAE Systems and the Royal Academy of Engineering. Recent research involves the development of atomic clocks using coherent population trapping and ultra-low phase noise microwave flywheel oscillator synthesiser chains with micro Hz resolution.
He has published a book on 'Fundamentals of RF Circuit Design with Low Noise Oscillators’ (Wiley).

Email:

Address:Department of Electronic Engineering, University of York, , Heslington York, England, United Kingdom, YO10-5DD,