Navigation: The Road to GPS and Getting Beyond It

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Navigation can be viewed as merely determining position or direction, but more commonly it relies on knowledge of position or direction to control or monitor movement from one place to another. In this talk, the field of navigation is introduced, including the evolution of techniques up through modern navigation dominated by electronic navigation including radio, radar, and satellite. The working of GPS, a navigation system based on a constellation of satellites in medium earth orbit that provides positioning information with global coverage is explained. Since its launch in 1978, it has been in ever wider use for finding and keeping track of just about anything: people, animals, boats, trucks, planes, and more. Its initial military uses have expanded far into civilian applications both for individuals and for large-scale commerce and transportation. The wide availability of first personal vehicle GPS navigation and later mobile phone-based navigation have changed how the world does business and how people and goods are moved around. As more and more vehicles and people rely upon it, any threats to GPS navigation become more dangerous. This is a result that more systems have become completely or primarily dependent on GPS for guidance and navigation. Simple jamming of the GPS can render a system completely blind to its location, while more sophisticated attacks can spoof a GPS signal to control its navigation. Future trends and technologies to address the security issue and to move forward in navigation are discussed.



  Date and Time

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  • 1745 West Nursery Road Linthicum, MD 21090
  • Linthicum, Maryland
  • United States 21090
  • Building: National Electronics Museum
  • Room Number: Conference Room
  • Click here for Map

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  • Co-sponsored by CH02182 - Washington/Baltimore/No VA Jt Sections Chap,CAS04


  Speakers

Kathleen Kramer of University of San Diego

Topic:

Navigation: The Road to GPS and Getting Beyond It

Navigation can be viewed as merely determining position or direction, but more commonly it relies on knowledge of position or direction to control or monitor movement from one place to another. In this talk, the field of navigation is introduced, including the evolution of techniques up through modern navigation dominated by electronic navigation including radio, radar, and satellite. The working of GPS, a navigation system based on a constellation of satellites in medium earth orbit that provides positioning information with global coverage is explained. Since its launch in 1978, it has been in ever wider use for finding and keeping track of just about anything: people, animals, boats, trucks, planes, and more. Its initial military uses have expanded far into civilian applications both for individuals and for large-scale commerce and transportation. The wide availability of first personal vehicle GPS navigation and later mobile phone-based navigation have changed how the world does business and how people and goods are moved around. As more and more vehicles and people rely upon it, any threats to GPS navigation become more dangerous. This is a result that more systems have become completely or primarily dependent on GPS for guidance and navigation. Simple jamming of the GPS can render a system completely blind to its location, while more sophisticated attacks can spoof a GPS signal to control its navigation. Future trends and technologies to address the security issue and to move forward in navigation are discussed.

Biography:

Kathleen A. Kramer is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of San Diego, San Diego, CA. She worked to develop new engineering programs as a founding member of the faculty and eventually became the chair of electrical engineering, and then serving as Director of Engineering (2004-2013), providing academic leadership for all of the university’s engineering programs. She has also been a Member of Technical Staff at several companies, including ViaSat, Hewlett Packard, and Bell Communications Research. Author or co-author of over 100 publications, she maintains an active research agenda and has recent publications in the areas of multisensor data fusion, intelligent systems, and neural and fuzzy systems. Her teaching interests are in the areas of signals and systems, communication systems, and capstone design.  She received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering magna cum laude with a second major in physics from Loyola Marymount University, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. 

She chairs the AESS Technical Panel on Cyber Security and is the Chair of the San Diego Chapter of the IEEE Aerospace Electronics Systems Society, leading an active chapter that serves engineers and scientists from a large, diverse complex systems industry base. In 2015, she is contributing to the conference committees of both the 34th AESS/AIAA Digital Avionics Systems Conference and the 2015 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference. She is the 2015-16 Director Elect of IEEE Region 6 (Western USA) and in that role develops and supports technical, educational, professional and humanitarian activities in the geographic region that reaches 12 western states and borders all four IEEE international regions.  She is an IEEE member of the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, leading engineering accreditation reviews at universities both in the US and internationally. 

She is a past Chair of the IEEE San Diego Section and branch counselor to the IEEE Student Branch at the University of San Diego. She is also Chief Advisor to the California Alpha Epsilon Chapter of Tau Beta Pi (2012) and a member of other honor societies, including IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu. She has twice been recognized by the San Diego Engineering Council as the Engineering Educator of the Year as part of the celebration for National Engineers Week (1994, 2003). She was also principle investigator of a recent National Science Foundation project (no. 0948070) to connect veterans into undergraduate degrees in engineering and the number of veteran transfer students at her institution increased by nearly three-fold since her project began.

Address:San Diego, California, United States





Agenda

6:00pm - 6:45pm: Check-in & Networking; light dinner

6:45pm - 8:30pm: Lecture / Q&A



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