Antenna Technologies for Achieving Spectrum Dominance

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Hosted by the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society (AESS) Denver Chapter and the Association of Old Crows


Recent developments in materials, solid-state and digital electronics have shown that the new transmit and/or receive systems capable of carrying out smart and adaptable spectrum sensing and control functionalities through the millimeter waves are now feasible.  In this talk, we discuss a few important aspects of antenna systems developed for the above stated mission. First we review a systematic development of components, devices, and antenna subsystems aimed for high-power applications in 0.5-110GHz range. Starting from a basic transmission line, we discuss the design and performance of new antennas, dividers, hybrids, couplers, twists, etc., as well as more complex systems including ortho-mode transducers. While this research is aimed for space-constrained platforms, the results can be successfully utilized across different systems. Next, we show a family of front-end subsystems designed and fabricated for wideband spectrum sensing missions through 110GHz. Single-aperture analog and digital beam-formed antennas, Butler matrix, Rotman and Luneburg lens arrays are built using conventional and emerging techniques and their superior wideband, low-loss performance is experimentally demonstrated. Low-cost prototyping for assessing the performance of emerging front-end systems is also discussed.



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  • Engineering Dr
  • Boulder, Colorado
  • United States 80302
  • Building: Discovery Learning Center
  • Room Number: Colaboratory Room 1B70
  • Click here for Map
  • Co-sponsored by Association of Old Crows - Mile High Chapter
  • No Admission Charge
  • Starts 02 October 2018 10:24 PM
  • Ends 29 October 2018 11:00 PM
  • All times are America/Denver


  Speakers

Prof. Dejan Filipovic of University of Colorado, Boulder

Topic:

Antenna Technologies for Achieving Spectrum Dominance

Recent developments in materials, solid-state and digital electronics have shown that the new transmit and/or receive systems capable of carrying out smart and adaptable spectrum sensing and control functionalities through the millimeter waves are now feasible.  In this talk, we discuss a few important aspects of antenna systems developed for the above stated mission. First we review a systematic development of components, devices, and antenna subsystems aimed for high-power applications in 0.5-110GHz range. Starting from a basic transmission line, we discuss the design and performance of new antennas, dividers, hybrids, couplers, twists, etc., as well as more complex systems including ortho-mode transducers. While this research is aimed for space-constrained platforms, the results can be successfully utilized across different systems. Next, we show a family of front-end subsystems designed and fabricated for wideband spectrum sensing missions through 110GHz. Single-aperture analog and digital beam-formed antennas, Butler matrix, Rotman and Luneburg lens arrays are built using conventional and emerging techniques and their superior wideband, low-loss performance is experimentally demonstrated. Low-cost prototyping for assessing the performance of emerging front-end systems is also discussed.

Biography:

Dejan S. Filipovic is Hudson Moore Jr. Endowed Chair with the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering at University of Colorado Boulder. He received the Diploma Engineering degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nis, Serbia in 1994, and the M.S.E.E. and PhD degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1999 and 2002, respectively. From 1994 to 1997, he was a research assistant at the University of Nis. He became an assistant professor in electrical and computer engineering the University of Colorado in 2002 and was promoted to associate and full professor in 2009 and 2015, respectively. His broader research interests are in applied electromagnetics including antenna theory and design with emphasis on frequency independent and wideband antennas; development of passive millimeter-wave components, systems, and electronic warfare front-ends; low-cost fabrication of RF systems; simultaneous transmit and receive; and multi-physics, multi-scale modeling. His research projects have been funded by the Department of Defense including DARPA, ONR, and NRL, National Science Foundation, and industry including Lockheed Martin, First RF, Applied EM, etc. Prof. Filipovic received the Nikola Tesla award for outstanding diploma thesis and best paper award at the 2002 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Symposium. His students have been constantly placed in the finals of the various student paper competitions and have won several times including best paper awards at IEEE Antennas and Propagation Symposium, Antenna Application Symposium, ASIAEM Conference, and GOMACTech. Prof. Filipovic was a two-time recipient of the University of Colorado Provost’s Faculty Achievement Award (2008 and 2011), ECEN Department’s Holland Teaching (2013) and Top Performer (2017) Awards. He has graduated eighteen PhD and six MSc thesis students, and directs Antenna Research Group (ARG) with 17 members. Prof. Filipovic has co-authored 4 book chapters, and many peer reviewed journal and conference papers. Prof. Filipovic is a Senior Member of IEEE and Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation.

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Agenda

1800-1830: Networking, food (light dinner)

1830-1930: Feature presentation

1930-2000: Antenna Research Group Lab tour