IEEE AP/MTT/EMC/ED TURKEY CHAPTER SEMINAR SERIES -- SEMINAR 44

Share

Speaker: Asst. Prof. Emre Akbaş, Middle East Technical University

Topic: "Object Detection Through Search with a Foveated Visual System"

Location: Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

Abstract: In this talk, I will present a foveated object detector (FOD) as a biologically-inspired alternative to the sliding window (SW) approach which is the dominant method of search in computer vision object detection. Similar to the human visual system, the FOD has higher resolution at the fovea and lower resolution at the visual periphery. Consequently, more computational resources are allocated at the fovea and relatively fewer at the periphery. The FOD processes the entire scene, uses retino-specific object detection classifiers to guide eye movements, aligns its fovea with regions of interest in the input image and integrates observations across multiple fixations. Our approach combines object detectors from computer vision with a recent model of peripheral pooling regions found at the V1 layer of the human visual system. We assessed various eye movement strategies on the PASCAL VOC 2007 dataset and show that the FOD performs on par with the SW detector while bringing significant computational cost savings.

Bio: Dr. Emre Akbas is an assistant professor at the Department of Computer Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU). Prior to joining METU, he was a postdoctoral research associate at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara. He received his PhD degree from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. His BS and MS degrees are from the Department of Computer Engineering, METU.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Ankara, Ankara
  • Turkey

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=39.9215219%2c32


  Speakers

Asst. Prof. Emre Akbaş

Topic:

Object Detection Through Search with a Foveated Visual System