CONFÉRENCE CHAPITRE CAS/EMB: Quantitative separation of the depressive phase of Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder using Electrovestibulography

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No electrophysiological, neuroimaging or genetic markers have been established that strongly relate to the diagnostic separation of the depressive phases of Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This talk will describe the potential of features, extracted from the recording of electrical activity from the outer ear canal, in a process called Electrovestibulography (EVestG), for identifying depressed and partly remitted/remitted MDD and BD patients from each other.

Methods. From EVestG data sensory vestibulo-acoustic four features were extracted from both background (no movement) and using a single supine-vertical translation stimulus to distinguish 27 controls, 39 MDD subjects and 43 BD subjects.

Results. Using leave-one-out-cross-validation, unbiased parametric and non-parametric classification routines resulted in 78-83% (2-3 features), 80-81% (1-2 features) and 66-68% (3 features) accuracies for separation of MDD from BD, controls from depressed (BD & MDD) and the 3-way separation of BD from MDD from control groups respectively.

Conclusions. EVestG features can identify depressed and partly remitted/remitted MDD and BD patients from each other.



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  • 1065 avenue de la médecine
  • Québec, Quebec
  • Canada G1V 0A6
  • Building: Pavillon Pouliot
  • Room Number: PLT 1138H

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  Speakers

Brian Lithgow of Alfred Hospital (Melbourne, Australia) and Riverview Health Centre (Winnipeg, Canada)

Topic:

Quantitative separation of the depressive phase of Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder using Electrovestibulo

No electrophysiological, neuroimaging or genetic markers have been established that strongly relate to the diagnostic separation of the depressive phases of Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This talk will describe the potential of features, extracted from the recording of electrical activity from the outer ear canal, in a process called Electrovestibulography (EVestG), for identifying depressed and partly remitted/remitted MDD and BD patients from each other.

Methods. From EVestG data sensory vestibulo-acoustic four features were extracted from both background (no movement) and using a single supine-vertical translation stimulus to distinguish 27 controls, 39 MDD subjects and 43 BD subjects.

Results. Using leave-one-out-cross-validation, unbiased parametric and non-parametric classification routines resulted in 78-83% (2-3 features), 80-81% (1-2 features) and 66-68% (3 features) accuracies for separation of MDD from BD, controls from depressed (BD & MDD) and the 3-way separation of BD from MDD from control groups respectively.

Conclusions. EVestG features can identify depressed and partly remitted/remitted MDD and BD patients from each other.

Biography:

Professor Brian Lithgow is currently the Leader of the Diagnostic and Neurosignal Processing Research Groups at the Alfred Hospital (Melbourne, Australia) and Riverview Health Centre (Winnipeg, Canada). He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Alfred Hospital and Research Affiliate at Riverview Health Center. His appointments include Adjunct Professor at the University of Manitoba, Canada and Adjunct Assoc. Professor at Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Center. He founded the Monash University Centre for Biomedical Engineering (MUCBE) and was the Director of Teaching for MUCBE from 2001-2010.

Recent Research: Diagnostics development for neurological and neurodegenerative disorders: Dementia, Parkinson’s Disease, Vertiginous Disorders, Post-concussion syndrome, Bipolar disorder and Major Depressive disorder (4 patents).

  • The successful quantitative separation of unipolar and bipolar depression is a world first.
  • Current research aims at separating Dementia types and predicting treatment efficacy.
  • An animal study is looking at modelling of vestibular electro-neurophysiology.

 

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