Modernizing Computer Architecture Education After the Death of Moore’s Law

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IEEE Denver Computer, Information Theory, and Robotics Society Technical Meeting


Prof. Keith Graham, University of Colorado, IEEE CIR Guest Lecturer

 Abstract: "Modernizing Computer Architecture Education after the death of Moore’s Law"

Keith Graham, is the “Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering” Department’s Associate Chair of Undergraduate Education at the University of Colorado (UC), Boulder. At UC Boulder Mr Graham is responsible for aligning the undergraduate education program and developing strategies to educate students for both future academia opportunities and as engineers in industry. Mr. Graham also teaches undergraduate courses in Embedded Software Engineering, Computer Architecture, and courses in CU’s Professional Master of Embedded Systems Engineering program in both firmware and hardware for Internet of Things application. Recently,

Mr. Graham has additionally also begun to teach a graduate level courses in customizing RISC-V processor cores for specific applications. The basis of this new course Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) design has Keith on a journey of re-evaluating how we should teach Computer Architecture after the death of Moore’s Law. Mr. Graham’s research interests are leading him to currently work toward a project to investigate specialized processors for specific applications.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • 2155 East Wesley Avenue
  • Denver, Colorado
  • United States 80208
  • Building: Ritchie School of Engineering
  • Room Number: 400

Staticmap?size=250x200&sensor=false&zoom=14&markers=39.67382535%2c 104
  • Co-sponsored by James Gowans
  • Starts 01 May 2019 11:06 AM
  • Ends 12 September 2019 06:00 PM
  • All times are US/Mountain
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Keith Graham

Topic:

Modernizing Computer Architecture Education after the death of Moore’s Law

Is it the death of Moore’s Law that has limited the growth in performance of computers or did a different law breakdown? Dennard Scaling, the concept that as silicon technology node shrinks, the power proportionally will be reduced. For example, if the silicon processing node shrinks in half, power would be reduced in half allowing twice the number of transistors to be on the chip and dissipate the same power as the preceding technology. With Dennard Scaling beginning to breakdown around 2006, the number of transistors could still be added at the cost of dissipating more and more heat. Over the last several years, the power wall has been reached limiting the general processing performance growth from doubling every two years to 3-5%. The demands and requirements for processing power are far out pacing our ability to create faster and faster general processors. To meet today’s and future requirements, Application/Domain Specific Computer Architectures will need to be deployed. These architectures can be targeted specific processor cores or cores with customized processing elements to optimize the solution. This talk will discuss Computer Architecture in undergraduate education and possible new ways that Computer Architecture should be taught. We welcome you and hope to see you there, this is going to be a great event!

Biography:

Keith Graham, is the “Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering” Department’s Associate Chair of Undergraduate Education at the University of Colorado (UC), Boulder. At UC Boulder Mr Graham is responsible for aligning the undergraduate education program and developing strategies to educate students for both future academia opportunities and as engineers in industry. Mr. Graham also teaches undergraduate courses in Embedded Software Engineering, Computer Architecture, and courses in CU’s Professional Master of Embedded Systems Engineering program in both firmware and hardware for Internet of Things application. Recently,

Mr. Graham has additionally also begun to teach a graduate level courses in customizing RISC-V processor cores for specific applications. The basis of this new course Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) design has Keith on a journey of re-evaluating how we should teach Computer Architecture after the death of Moore’s Law. Mr. Graham’s research interests are leading him to currently work toward a project to investigate specialized processors for specific applications.