Distinguished Lecture: Recent Results and Open Problems in Evolutionary Multiobjective Optimization

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Evolutionary algorithms (as well as a number of other metaheuristics) have become a popular choice for solving problems having two or more (often conflicting) objectives (the so-called multi-objective optimization problems). This area, known as EMOO (Evolutionary Multi-Objective Optimization) has had an important growth in the last 15 years, and several people (particularly newcomers) get the impression that it is now very difficult to make contributions of sufficient value to justify, for example, a PhD thesis. However, a lot of interesting research is still under way. In this talk, we will review some of the research topics on evolutionary multi-objective optimization that are currently attracting a lot of interest (e.g., handling many objectives, hybridization, indicator-based selection, use of surrogates, etc.) and which represent good opportunities for doing research. Some of the challenges currently faced by this discipline will also be delineated.

 



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  • Stellenbosch University
  • Banghoek Road
  • Stellenbosch, Western Cape
  • South Africa
  • Building: Knowledge Centre, Engineering
  • Room Number: K303
  • Starts 11 August 2019 10:50 PM
  • Ends 15 August 2019 10:50 PM
  • All times are Africa/Johannesburg
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Carlos Coello Coello
Carlos Coello Coello

Biography:

Dinstinguished Lecturer, Carlos Artemio Coello Coello, received a PhD in Computer Science from Tulane University (USA) in 1996. His research has mainly focused on the design of new multi-objective optimization algorithms based on bio-inspired metaheuristics, which is an area in which he has made pioneering contributions. He currently has over 470 publications which, according to Google Scholar, report over 43,900 citations (with an h-index of 83). He has received several awards, including the National Research Award (in 2007) from the Mexican Academy of Science (in the area of exact sciences), the 2009 Medal to the Scientific Merit from Mexico City’s congress, the Ciudad Capital: Heberto Castillo 2011 Award for scientists under the age of 45, in Basic Science, the 2012 Scopus Award (Mexico’s edition) for being the most highly cited scientist in engineering in the 5 years previous to the award and the 2012 National Medal of Science in Physics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences from Mexico’s presidency (this is the most important award that a scientist can receive in Mexico). He is also the recipient of the prestigious 2013 IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award, “for pioneering contributions to single- and multiobjective optimization techniques using bioinspired metaheuristics” and of the 2016 The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) Award in “Engineering Sciences”. Since January 2011, he is an IEEE Fellow. He is also Associate Editor of several journals including the two most prestigious in his area: IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation and Evolutionary Computation. He is currently Vicepresident for Member Activities of the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS), an IEEE CIS Distinguished Lecturer and Full Professor with distinction at the Computer Science Department of CINVESTAV-IPN in Mexico City, Mexico.