How you Look at it Matters: Investigations in Hyperspectral BRDF and the Role of Serendipity in Research

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The increasing reliance on optical remote sensing data to provide essential data for management and modelling of our planet has opened up many opportunities for research in remote sensing.  It has also drawn attention to the complexity of that these data represent.  In this talk, Professor Coburn will address past research into the effects and impacts of spectral reflectance variability with respect to view and illumination angles.  Research into the complex nature of a surface’s spectral reflectance field has always been hampered by lack of available instruments to conduct the measurements – it has also been restricted due to larger and more pressing questions in the science.  Has the time come to begin re-writing these basic constructs?



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  • 54 Lomb Memorial Drive
  • Center for Image Science at RIT
  • Rochester, New York
  • United States 14623
  • Building: 76
  • Room Number: 1125
  • Click here for Map


  Speakers

Dr. Craig Colbourn
Dr. Craig Colbourn

Topic:

How you Look at it Matters: Investigations in Hyperspectral BRDF and the Role of Serendipity in Research

The increasing reliance on optical remote sensing data to provide essential data for management and modelling of our planet has opened up many opportunities for research in remote sensing.  It has also drawn attention to the complexity of that these data represent.  In this talk, Professor Coburn will address past research into the effects and impacts of spectral reflectance variability with respect to view and illumination angles.  Research into the complex nature of a surface’s spectral reflectance field has always been hampered by lack of available instruments to conduct the measurements – it has also been restricted due to larger and more pressing questions in the science.  Has the time come to begin re-writing these basic constructs?

Biography:

Dr. Coburn is a remote sensing scientist working in the Department of Geography at the University of Lethbridge since 2002.  With over 20 years of remote sensing experience, Dr. Coburn focuses his research efforts on the fundamental aspects of remote sensing science, with specific interests in low-cost remote sensing solutions and remote sensing instrument development.  Recently this research has involved studying the nature of surface bidirectional spectral reflectance properties.  This research has led to the development of various instruments for the sampling of surface BRDF primarily for use in understanding agricultural crops and other biological systems as well as efforts in the calibration and validation of remote sensing instruments.

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Address:Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada