What's my measurement equipment actually doing? Implications for 5G, mmw and related applications.

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VIDEO BROADCAST: This lecture will be broadcast live and recorded on Zoom.  Register below for FREE!


Register to watch Anritsu Fellow and MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer Dr. Jon Martens explain the challenges of 5G/mmw measurements!



  Date and Time

  Location

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  Registration



  • Online Webinar, California
  • United States


  Speakers

Jon Martens
Jon Martens of Anritsu & IEEE MTT-S

Topic:

What's my measurement equipment actually doing? Implications for 5G, mmw and related applications.

Biography:

Jon Martens has been with Anritsu since 1995 where he is currently an Engineering Fellow. His research interests include measurement system architectures and pathologies, millimeter-wave circuit and system design, and a wide range of microwave measurement processes to include materials analysis, nonlinear and quasi-linear characterization, optical interactions and calibration.

He is the inventor or co-inventor on over 17 patents, has (co-)authored several book chapters and over 50 technical publications. Dr. Martens is a past chair of the MTT measurements technical subcommittee and is a past president of the measurements society ARFTG and is still active in both. He is a member of the technical program subcommittees for the International Microwave Symposium and ARFTG and is a former associate editor for the Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques.





Agenda

Topic:  What's my measurement equipment actually doing? Implications for 5G, mmw and related applications. (Click Here to Register)

Speaker: Dr. Jon Martens, Fellow - Anritsu and MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer.

Abstract: 

Current microwave and high frequency instrumentation perform many tasks behind the scenes, even more so in the mm-wave and high modulation rate regimes (pertinent to new and upcoming communications standards and other applications), and it is easy to lose track of how the equipment, the processing algorithms, the setup and the signals are interacting.  By exploring the measurement mechanics within some common instruments under practical conditions, it may be easier to understand where sensitivities or anomalies might increase and how to mitigate them.  Through a study of example architectures and measurements, including those in the 100+ GHz range and those with wide modulation bandwidths where linearity, dynamic range and other physical metrics are stressed even more, mechanisms and ideas for better measurements will be explored.

 

VIDEO BROADCAST: This lecture will be broadcast live and recorded on Zoom. Click here to register for FREE and receive an email with online conference details, a few hours before the event.