IEEE CS Webinar: IEEE Oregon Section Technical Seminar - Quo Vadis Digital Microfluidic Biochips? From Laboratory Research to Commercialization and Beyond

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Guest Speaker:Krishnendu Chakrabarty, the John Cocke Distinguished Professor and Department Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Professor of Computer Science, IEEE/ACM Fellow, Duke University

Presenting:Quo Vadis Digital Microfluidic Biochips? From Laboratory Research to Commercialization and Beyond

Venue:Online

When:Oct. 29th7-8 pm

Abstract:

Digital microfluidics was transitioned to the marketplace for sample preparation by Illumina a few years ago. Since then, this technology has also been deployed by Genmark for infectious disease testing and Baebies for the detection of lysosomal enzymes in newborns. This lecture will describe the journey from early laboratory research, PhD theses and publication of research articles, to technology transfer and licensing to companies.  Today’s microfluidic biochips are fully automated under program control and they can be dynamically reconfigured using sensor data. However, despite these success stories, there still remains a gap between microfluidics research and its adoption in microbiology. The presenter will describe how this gap can potentially be closed with new directions in digital microfluidics, including recent advances in using micro-electrode-dot arrays and acoustofluidics.



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  • Date: 29 Oct 2020
  • Time: 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
  • All times are US/Pacific
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Virtual

  • Online Meeting

  • Sohrab Aftabjahani, PhD

    IEEE Oregon Section Computer Society Chapter Chair

    Senior IEEE Member, Senior ACM Member

    aftabjahani@ieee.org

  • Co-sponsored by Michael Bates
  • Starts 01 October 2020 01:40 AM
  • Ends 29 October 2020 06:30 PM
  • All times are US/Pacific
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Topic:

Quo Vadis Digital Microfluidic Biochips? From Laboratory Research to Commercialization and Beyond

Krishnendu Chakrabarty

The John Cocke Distinguished Professor and Department Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Professor of Computer Science at Duke University, IEEE/ACM Fellow

 Abstract:

Digital microfluidics was transitioned to the marketplace for sample preparation by Illumina a few years ago. Since then, this technology has also been deployed by Genmark for infectious disease testing and Baebies for the detection of lysosomal enzymes in newborns. This lecture will describe the journey from early laboratory research, PhD theses and publication of research articles, to technology transfer and licensing to companies.  Today’s microfluidic biochips are fully automated under program control and they can be dynamically reconfigured using sensor data. However, despite these success stories, there still remains a gap between microfluidics research and its adoption in microbiology. The presenter will describe how this gap can potentially be closed with new directions in digital microfluidics, including recent advances in using micro-electrode-dot arrays and acoustofluidics.

Biography:

Krishnendu Chakrabarty received the B. Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, in 1990, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1992 and 1995, respectively. He is now the John Cocke Distinguished Professor and Department Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), and Professor of Computer Science, at Duke University.

 

Prof. Chakrabarty is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator award, the Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany, the IEEE Transactions on CAD Donald O. Pederson Best Paper Award (2015), the ACM Transactions on Design Automation of Electronic Systems Best Paper Award (2017), multiple IBM Faculty Awards and HP Labs Open Innovation Research Awards, and over a dozen best paper awards at major conferences.  He is also a recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award (2015), the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Charles A. Desoer Technical Achievement Award (2017), the Semiconductor Research Corporation Technical Excellence Award (2018), and the IEEE Test Technology Technical Council Bob Madge Innovation Award (2018). He is a 2018 recipient of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellowship in the “Short Term S: Nobel Prize Level” category.

 

Prof. Chakrabarty’s current research projects include: design-for-testability of integrated circuits and systems (especially 3D integration and system-on-chip); microfluidic biochips; hardware security; machine learning for fault diagnosis, failure prediction, healthcare, and biochemical analysis; neuromorphic computing systems. He is a Fellow of ACM, a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of AAAS, and a Golden Core Member of the IEEE Computer Society. He was a Distinguished Visitor of the IEEE Computer Society (2005-2007, 2010-2012), a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (2006-2007, 2012-2013), and an ACM Distinguished Speaker (2008-2016). Prof. Chakrabarty served as the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Design & Test of Computers during 2010-2012, ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems during 2010-2015, and IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems during 2015-2018.





Venue:Online

When:Oct. 29th7-8 pm