State-of-the-Art Automotive Radar System Architectures - and What Else We Can Do with Them

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IEEE North Jersey Section Coposnsors Webinary by MTT-DML talk


This talk will be reviewing the state-of-the-art system architecture of automotive radar sensors and will present some novel ideas and applications on how the performance of that automotive “mass-product” can be further improved and how their flexibility allows for widespread use, far away from adaptive cruise control.

 Virtual Meeting: Participants can join from anywhere.

Meeting Link: Click the link below.

(Register now)

 

Date: Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Time: 12:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

Duration: 1 hour



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Global Access-Facebook Live Video Presenation
  • North Jersey, New Jersey
  • United States
  • Building: Remote-Anywhere
  • Ajay Poddar (akpoddar@ieee.org), Durga Misra (dmisra@njit.edu), Edip Niver (edip.niver@njit.edu), Anisha Apte (anisha_apte@ieee.org)

  • Co-sponsored by North Jersey MTT/AP & ED/CAS Chapters
  • Starts 06 October 2020 10:00 AM
  • Ends 10 November 2020 12:00 PM
  • All times are US/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Dr. Markus Gardill

Dr. Markus Gardill of University of Würzburg

Topic:

State-of-the-Art Automotive Radar System Architectures - and What Else We Can Do with Them

Automotive Radar operating in the 77 GHz and 79 GHz bands is the largest market for mmWave systems. Consequently, a de-facto standard system architecture has evolved which is used by most devices on the market and under current development. Modern automotive radars are to a large extent software-defined and enable adaptive selection of waveform parameters as well as dynamic utilization of RF subsystems such as transmit and receive channels. This flexibility is the key enabler for implementing multi-purpose radar sensors, which can realize functions from adaptive cruise control down to automated parking all in one device. Together with the high-volume of automotive radars also comes a rapid cost-reduction. Consequently, they become more and more attractive for solving various other sensing challenges: something else they have originally been designed for.

After reviewing the state-of-the-art system architecture of automotive radar sensors, this presentation will introduce some novel ideas and applications on how the performance of that automotive “mass-product” can be further improved and how their flexibility allows for widespread use, far away from adaptive cruise control.

Biography:

Dr.

Markus Gardill is a professor for Satellite Communication Systems at the chair of computer science VII - robotics and telematics at the University of Würzburg. He received the Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing. degree in systems of information and multimedia technology/electrical engineering from the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany, in 2010 and 2015, respectively, where he was a research assistant, teaching fellow, and later head of the team for radio communication technology.

Between 2015 and 2020 he was an R&D engineer and research cluster owner for optical and imaging metrology systems at Robert Bosch GmbH. Later he joined InnoSenT GmbH as head of the group radar signal processing & tracking, developing together with his team new generations of automotive radar sensors for advanced driver assistance systems and autonomous driving.

His main research interest includes radar and communication systems, antenna (array) design, and signal processing algorithms.

His particular interest is space-time processing such as e.g. beamforming and direction-of-arrival estimation, together with cognitive and adaptive systems. He has a special focus on combining the domains of signal processing and microwave/electromagnetics to develop new approaches on antenna array implementation and array signal processing. His further research activities include distributed coherent/non-coherent networks for advanced detection and perception, machine-learning techniques for spatial signal processing, highly-flexible software-defined radio/radar systems, and communication systems for NewSpace.

Markus Gardill is a member of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (IEEE MTT-S). He served as co-chair of the IEEE MTT-S Technical Committee Digital Signal Processing (MTT-9), regularly acts as a reviewer and TPRC member for several journals and conferences, and currently serves as associate editor of the Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques. He is a Distinguished Microwave Lecturer (DML) for the DML term 2018-2020 with a presentation on signal processing and system aspects of automotive radar systems.

Address: Professor, University of Würzburg,





Agenda

Automotive Radar – a Signal Processing Perspective on Current Technology and Future Systems (Register now)



MTT-S Distinguish Microwave Lecture Talk