Integration Strategies to Meet Low Power Requirements of Biosensor Interfaces?

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This talk will review the integration of thin film transistor sensor interfaces for newly emerging application areas. We will discuss the critical design considerations to show how device-circuit interactions should be handled and how compensation methods can be implemented for stable and reliable operation. In particular, the quest for low power becomes highly compelling in wearable devices and biosensors. We will discuss device operation in the different regimes, and review device properties when operated in the deep sub-threshold regime or in near-OFF state, addressing the pivotal requirement of low supply voltage and ultralow power leading to potentially battery-less operation of sensor systems.



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  • Sydney, New South Wales
  • Australia 2109

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  • Co-sponsored by Prof. Subhas Mukhopadhyay


  Speakers

Prof. Arokia Nathan of Canbridge University

Topic:

Integration Strategies to Meet Low Power Requirements of Biosensor Interfaces?

Abstract: This talk will review the integration of thin film transistor sensor interfaces for newly emerging application areas. We will discuss the critical design considerations to show how device-circuit interactions should be handled and how compensation methods can be implemented for stable and reliable operation. In particular, the quest for low power becomes highly compelling in wearable devices and biosensors. We will discuss device operation in the different regimes, and review device properties when operated in the deep sub-threshold regime or in near-OFF state, addressing the pivotal requirement of low supply voltage and ultralow power leading to potentially battery-less operation of sensor systems.

Biography:

Arokia Nathan (S’84–M’87–SM’99–F’10) is a leading pioneer in the development and application of thin film transistor technologies to flexible electronics, display and sensor systems. Following his PhD in Electrical Engineering, University of Alberta, Canada in 1988, he joined LSI Logic USA and subsequently the Institute of Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, Switzerland, before joining the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Waterloo, Canada. In 2006, he joined the London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London as the Sumitomo Chair of Nanotechnology. He moved to Cambridge University in 2011 as the Chair of Photonic Systems and Displays, and he is currently a Bye-Fellow and Tutor at Darwin College. He has over 600 publications including 4 books, and more that 110 patents and four spin-off companies. He is a Fellow of IEEE, an IEEE/EDS Distinguished Lecturer, a Chartered Engineer (UK), Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (UK), and winner of the 2020 IEEE EDS JJ Ebers Award.