EDS Distinguished Lecture - Self-Heating in FinFETs: Characterization, Reliability and Impact on Logic Circuits

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The Circuits & Devices Chapter of IEEE Toronto is pleased to invite you to join us for a virtual talk by Distinguished Lecturer Dr. Durga Misra of the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

Please see below for schedule and details.



  Date and Time

  Location

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  • Date: 31 Mar 2021
  • Time: 06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) EST
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This event will be a virtual talk held on Zoom.

Invitations will be emailed to registered guests before the event. 

  • Toronto, Ontario
  • Canada

  • Starts 15 February 2021 12:00 AM
  • Ends 31 March 2021 04:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) EST
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA

Topic:

Self-Heating in FinFETs: Characterization, Reliability and Impact on Logic Circuits

Device scaling for sub-10 nm CMOS technology has introduced bulk/SOI FinFETs This talk will outline the self-heating (SH) in FinFETs and its characterization. Local self-heating can potentially affect device performance and exacerbate the effects of some reliability mechanisms. Three different measurement methodologies for the electrical characterization of FinFET self-heating at wafer-level will be described. Also, the impact of self-heating on reliability testing at DC conditions as well as realistic CMOS logic operating (AC) conditions will be discussed. Front-end-of-line (FEOL) reliability mechanisms, such as hot carrier injection (HCI) and non-uniform time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) will also be outlined. Self-heating is also studied at more realistic device switching conditions in logic circuits by utilizing ring oscillators with several densities and stage counts. The measurements indicate that self-heating is considerably lower in logic circuits compared to constant voltage stress conditions and degradation is not distinguishable.

Biography:

Prof. Durga Misra is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA. His current research interests are in the areas of nanoelectronic/optoelectronic devices and circuits; especially in the area of nanometer CMOS gate stacks and device reliability. He is a Fellow of IEEE and is currently a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) and served in the IEEE EDS Board of Governors. He is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society (ECS). He received the Thomas Collinan Award from the Dielectric Science & Technology Division of ECS. He is also the winner of the Electronic and Photonic Division Award from ECS. He edited and co-edited more than 45 books and conference proceedings in his field of research. He has published more than 200 technical articles in peer reviewed Journals and in International Conference proceedings including 95 Invited Talks. He has graduated 19 PhD students and 40 MS students. He received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, in 1985 and 1988, respectively.

 

Website: http://web.njit.edu/~dmisra/