IEEE Central Coast Zoom - 17 November at 6:30PM - Still Time to Register for Professor Valentine's Talk

Share

Join us on Nov 17th @ 6:30 PM for Dr Megan Valentine's talk, " Exceptional soft materials, inspired by nature ". Her interdisciplinary research group investigates many aspects of biological and bioinspired materials, with an emphasis on understanding how forces are generated and transmitted in living materials, how these forces control cellular outcomes, and how the extraordinary features of living systems can be captured in manmade materials. Possible uses connective tissue repair and soft robotics.

Register NOW 

When you Register for the IEEE Event please include ­­your email address so you can be contacted if you win the "Door Prize". Only those who actually attend the Zoom talk will be included.

Please use the link below to log onto the Zoo­­m Event between 6:15 and 6:30 PM PDT on 17 November.

Having trouble getting on? If you don't have Zoom Client installed on your device download when you arrive at Zoom.

Best regards, Ruth Franklin IEEE Central Coast Chair

  1. Use link to access Zoom on November 17th between 6:15 PM for 6:30 PM.
  2. FYI: Zoom Meeting ID: 970 8235 5848, Passcode: 735956 


  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Date: 17 Nov 2021
  • Time: 06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada)
  • Add_To_Calendar_icon Add Event to Calendar

 link to access Zoom 

 

  • Goleta, California
  • United States 93117

  • Starts 31 October 2021 04:50 PM
  • Ends 17 November 2021 05:50 PM
  • All times are (UTC-08:00) Pacific Time (US & Canada)
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Dr. Megan Valentine Dr. Megan Valentine of UCSB - ME

Topic:

Exceptional soft materials, inspired by nature

Nature is replete with extraordinary materials that can grow, move, respond, and adapt.  In this talk I will describe my group’s efforts to develop ultrastiff, ultratough materials inspired by the byssal materials of marine mussels. These adhesive contacts allow mussels to secure themselves to rocks, wood, metals and other surfaces in the harsh conditions of the intertidal zone.  By developing a foundational understanding of the structure-mechanics relationships and processing of the natural system, we can design high-performance materials that are extremely strong without compromising extensibility, as well as macroporous materials with tunable toughness and strength. In the second half of the talk, I will describe new efforts to exploit light as a means of remote control and power. By leveraging the phototransduction pathways of highly-absorbing, negatively photochromic molecules, we can drive the motion of amorphous polymeric materials as well as liquid flows. These innovations enable applications in packaging, connective tissue repair, soft robotics, and optofluidics.

Biography:

Megan T. Valentine is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her interdisciplinary research group investigates many aspects of biological and bioinspired materials, with an emphasis on understanding how forces are generated and transmitted in living materials, how these forces control cellular outcomes, and how the extraordinary features of living systems can be captured in manmade materials. This highly interdisciplinary experimental work lies at the intersection of engineering, physics, biology and chemistry, and advances diverse application areas, ranging from marine-inspired materials to mechanobiology to soft robotics.

Megan received her B.S from Lehigh University ('97), M.S. from UPenn ('99) and Ph.D. from Harvard ('03), all in Physics. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford in the Department of Biological Sciences, where she was the recipient of a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Postdoctoral Fellowship, and a Burroughs Wellcome Career Award at the Scientific Interface. In 2008, she joined the faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she now serves as the Co-Director of the California NanoSystems Institute, and a co-leader of an IRG on Resilient Multiphase Soft Materials within the UC Santa Barbara Materials Research Laboratory, an NSF MRSEC. In 2013, she was awarded an NSF CAREER Award for her work on neuron mechanics, and in 2015 was awarded a Fulbright to study adhesion mechanics in Paris, France.  She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering