Soft Haptic Actuator for Hand-Held Devices

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The rapid development of smart material technology and hand held devices (for example VR controller, mobile devices) has created high demand for shape changing interfaces in order to provide users with more functions in less space and improved usability. However, the fundamental incompatibility between flexible displays and rigid actuator components has brought a huge barrier for commercialization of this technology. This seminar addresses a flexible and bendable vibrotactile actuator that can be easily applied to shape changing hand-held devices. One of the best-established technologies for flexible vibrotactile actuators is to use electroactive polymers (EAPs). There are two types of EAPs, ionic type and non-ionic type. In an ionic EAP, the movement of ions inside the polymer creates its actuation. Ionic EAPs allow relatively low input voltage, but they require high electric power (high electric current) for operation because high energy is necessary to maintain their deformed shape. Another problem is that their actuation force is not sufficiently strong to allow for clear perception. In contrast, non-ionic EAPs, for example, dielectric EAPs, have been researched with a keen interest for vibrotactile actuators owing to their fast response and high operational efficiency. However, non-ionic EAPs require a pre-stretching or multi- stacking process to be able to create large force enough to stimulate human mechanoreceptors. This strategy brought a new issue for low durability and/or a complex manufacturing process. This seminar addresses a robust and flexible vibrotactile actuator using an electro-active plasticized PVC to solve the problem.

 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Date: 01 Jul 2022
  • Time: 08:00 AM to 09:00 AM
  • All times are (GMT-06:00) US/Central
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It is a virtual online event. All registrants will be provided Zoom information on June 29th, 2022, at the closing of registration.

PLEASE KEEP A NOTE OF THE TIME ZONE FOR YOUR AREA. WE HAVE PROVIDED US-CENTRAL TIME OF THE HOSTS AS WELL AS THE SOUTH KOREAN TIME OF THE SPEAKER.

  • Houston, Texas
  • United States

  • Co-sponsored by IMEKO TC17 Technical Committee on Measurement and Control of Robotiucs.
  • Starts 04 May 2022 09:45 AM
  • Ends 29 June 2022 05:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-06:00) US/Central
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Sang-Youn of Director, Advanced Technology Research Center, South Korea

Topic:

Soft Haptic Actuator for Handheld Devices

The rapid development of smart material technology and handheld devices (for example VR controller, and mobile devices) has created high demand for shape-changing interfaces in order to provide users with more functions in less space and improved usability. However, the fundamental incompatibility between flexible displays and rigid actuator components has brought a huge barrier to the commercialization of this technology. This seminar addresses a flexible and bendable vibrotactile actuator that can be easily applied to shape-changing hand-held devices. One of the best-established technologies for flexible vibrotactile actuators is to use electroactive polymers (EAPs). There are two types of EAPs, ionic type and non-ionic type. In an ionic EAP, the movement of ions inside the polymer creates its actuation. Ionic EAPs allow relatively low input voltage, but they require high electric power (high electric current) for operation because high energy is necessary to maintain their deformed shape. Another problem is that their actuation force is not sufficiently strong to allow for clear perception. In contrast, non-ionic EAPs, for example, dielectric EAPs, have been researched with a keen interest in vibrotactile actuators owing to their fast response and high operational efficiency. However, non-ionic EAPs require a pre-stretching or multi-stacking process to be able to create large force enough to stimulate human mechanoreceptors. This strategy brought a new issue of low durability and/or a complex manufacturing process. This seminar addresses a robust and flexible vibrotactile actuator using an electro-active plasticized PVC to solve the problem.

Biography:

Sang-Youn Kim received a B.S. degree from Korea University, Korea, in 1994, and the M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, in 1996 and 2004, respectively. From 2004 to 2005, he was a Researcher with the Human Welfare Robot System Research Center. In 2005, he was a Research Staff at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology. He is currently a Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the Korea University of Technology and Education. His current research interests include human-computer interaction, virtual reality, and haptics.

Address:Director, Advanced Technology Research Center, South Korea, , South Korea