Nikola Tesla – The Pioneer who Paved the Road to the Electrical World as We Know It

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IEEE AP/MTT and VT Chapters Co-sponsor Event


The speaker presented a talk in 2006 at Penn State that was the 150 anniversary of the birth of Nikola Tesla, the inventor of many things that we still use today. That talk presented the history and life of Tesla who is one of the most interesting scientists and persons of all time. Many of Tesla’s most important inventions and patents will be discussed and how they changed the world as we know it now. Guglielmo Marconi is usually credited with inventing the radio, but it was shown after a long fight in 1943 that Tesla was indeed the first, and his much earlier patent proved it.
Unfortunately, Tesla’s death occurred about 6 months before the patent office corrected the history. In the talk at Penn State, many demos were performed and recorded on video. Some of these videos of the demos will be shown in various Tesla Coils including some playing music.


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  • Date: 29 Jun 2022
  • Time: 12:00 PM to 02:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
  • Add_To_Calendar_icon Add Event to Calendar
  • Mclean Blvd
  • Synergy Microwave
  • Paterson, New Jersey
  • United States 07504-1000
  • Room Number: 201

  • Ajay K. Poddar, email: akpoddar@ieee.org

    Anisha Apte, email: anisha_apte@ieee.org

     

  • Co-sponsored by IEEE North Jersey Section ED/CAS, AP/MTT17, AES, and VT Chapter
  • Starts 10 June 2022 10:00 AM
  • Ends 29 June 2022 12:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Prof.  James K. Breakall Prof. James K. Breakall of Penn State University

Topic:

Nikola Tesla – The Pioneer who Paved the Road to the Electrical World as We Know It

This talk will present the history and life of Nobel Laurett Nikola Tesla who is one of the most interesting scientists and persons of all time. He has a cult following and is the subject of many conspiracies and mysteries. He was at the forefront of the current wars at the time (DC vs AC), and his system of power generation is still the basic system we use to this day, quite a feat for something in engineering to last that long. DR. Dr. Nikola Tesla also had some very eccentric personality traits that I will discuss as well. His Tesla Coil invention is still a popular item to be built and causes fascination by many Tesla hobbyists. This talk will essentially be an abbreviated version of what was given at Penn State. Many of Tesla’s most important inventions and patents will be discussed and how they changed the world as we know it now. Guglielmo
Marconi is usually credited with inventing the radio, but it was shown after a long fight in 1943 that Dr. Tesla was indeed the first, and his much earlier patent proved it. Unfortunately, Tesla’s death occurred about 6 months before the patent office corrected the history. In the talk at Penn State, many demos were performed and recorded on video. Some of these videos of the demos will be shown in various Tesla Coils including some playing music.

Biography:

Dr. James K. Breakall received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Penn State University and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, and has over 45 years of experience in numerical electromagnetics and antennas. He was a Project Engineer at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA, and an Associate Professor at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPGS), Monterey, CA. Presently he is a Full Professor of Electrical Engineering at Penn State. Dr. Breakall began his career as a graduate student at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico working on antenna analysis and radar probing of the ionosphere. At LLNL, he and his group worked on the development of the Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC), the first
sophisticated antenna modeling program. Other significant projects that he has worked on were the designs of the HAARP facility in Alaska, both HF facilities at Arecibo, and the Kinstar low-profile AM broadcast antenna. He (electrical) and Tim Duffy (mechanical) designed the very
popular Ham Radio Skyhawk Yagi antenna, and he is the inventor of the Optimized Wideband Antenna (OWA). Dr. Breakall is also a life senior member of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, IEEE Broadcast Technology Society, Eta Kappa Nu, International Union of Radio Science Commission B, IEEE Wave Propagation and Standards Committee, and has been Associate Editor for the Radio Science journal, and served as an Arecibo Observatory Users and Scientific Advising Committee Member. He has graduated numerous graduate students and
received many awards over the years. In 2017, Dr. Breakall was awarded the prestigious Sarnoff Citation from the Radio Club of America (RCA). He was elected as a Director to the Board in 2018 and 2021 and the Chairman of the 2021 and 2022 Technical Symposium. He also serves on the RCA Scholarship and Educational Committees.
on the RCA Scholarship and Educational Committees.

Email:

Address:Professor, Electrical Engineering , 225 Electrical Engineering East Penn State University , University Park, Pennsylvania, United States, 16802

Dr. Georg Karawas Dr. Georg Karawas

Topic:

Three best known Circuit Charts for Microwave Measurement: Carte, Smith, and Buschbeck and the relations among them

This talk will discuss the three best-known Circuit Charts that were invented for the graphical calculation of Microwave measurements, Smith, Carter, and Buschbeck, and the relations among them.
The speaker will also discuss Measurement techniques of Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and some incorrect procedures that frequently occur as well as the Automation processes that were introduced using the Linux operating system, drawing parallels to similar measurements performed at the corresponding laboratory of the German Army (Bundeswehr) in Greding, Bavaria.

Biography:

Georg Karawas studied at the Technical University of Aachen (RWTH) Germany, obtaining a Dipl. Ing. degree in Communications Engineering (Nachrichtentechnik). Subsequently, he worked as an Electronics Engineer at the Greek Nuclear Research Center "Demokritos", while serving in the Greek Army, designing low-frequency tube amplifiers for one of the Greek Astronomical Observatories.
Georg came to the United States and obtained a Ph.D. in Electromagnetic Theory and Antennas under Robert Collin, resolving the dispute of the alleged "error" of Sommerfeld, proving that Sommerfeld was correct. He subsequently taught Circuit courses at Case Western Reserve University and redesigned the Circuits Lab experiments.
Georg joined AT&T Bell Laboratories and led the team (VMS) that introduced computerized Voice Messaging Service prior to the introduction of Answering Machines.  He also led the team that prototyped Video Telephony, using TV sets and Camcorders over Cable-TV, before the Internet.  His Team convinced AT&T Management to get involved in the Internet and introduce the so-called "Worldnet" dial-up service, back then the world's largest, now defunct.
Georg joined (S&TCD) the Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate of the US Army in Fort Monmouth, NJ, and later in Aberdeen Proving Ground Maryland. He was instrumental in automating Data Collection and Computerized Evaluation of High Frequency and Microwave Measurements.

Email:





Agenda

12:00 PM - Refreshments and Networking

12:00 PM-2:00 PM: Talk by Prof. James K. Break all, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

You do not have to be an IEEE Member to attend. Refreshment is free for all attendees. Please invite your friends and colleagues to take advantage of these Invited Lectures.



Co-sponsor by IEEE North Jersey Section