The role of an active matrix in microLED displays

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MicroLED technologies offer the potential for light sources that provide a high level of efficiency, control, and formatting flexibility.  The extraordinary luminance, lifetime, speed, color purity, and efficiency are unmatched by other emissive display technologies and have led to a number of exciting technology demonstrations.  One of the challenges microLEDs face is that the high current density required to drive the LEDs also requires an active matrix to appropriately drive the display.   In this presentation we will review a number of recent demonstrations, our proposed approaches, and the advantages – and challenges – offered by this co-integration in a variety of system formats. 



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  • Date: 27 Oct 2022
  • Time: 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
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  • Starts 29 September 2022 09:00 AM
  • Ends 27 October 2022 12:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
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  Speakers

Ioannis (John) Kymissis Ioannis (John) Kymissis

Topic:

The role of an active matrix in microLED displays

MicroLED technologies offer the potential for light sources that provide a high level of efficiency, control, and formatting flexibility.  The extraordinary luminance, lifetime, speed, color purity, and efficiency are unmatched by other emissive display technologies and have led to a number of exciting technology demonstrations.  One of the challenges microLEDs face is that the high current density required to drive the LEDs also requires an active matrix to appropriately drive the display.   In this presentation we will review a number of recent demonstrations, our proposed approaches, and the advantages – and challenges – offered by this co-integration in a variety of system formats.

 

Biography:

Ioannis (John) Kymissis is the Kenneth Brayer Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University and Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering.  He graduated with his SB, M.Eng., and Ph.D. degrees from MIT. His M.Eng. thesis was performed as a co-op at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Lab on organic thin-film transistors, and his Ph.D. was obtained in the Microsystems Technology Lab at MIT, working on field-emission displays. After graduation, he spent three years as a postdoc in MIT's Laboratory for Organic Optics and Electronics, working on a variety of organic electronic devices, and also as an engineer for QD Vision (later acquired by Samsung Electronics). He joined the faculty at Columbia University in electrical engineering in 2006. He is a fellow of the IEEE and SID, and was the general chair for the 2014 Device Research Conference.

Email:

Address:Chair, Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia University SEAS, 500 W120th Street, New York, New York, United States, 10027