Eliminating Bias from Technology for Developers

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Abstract:  As reported in the Forbes article “The Role Of Bias In Artificial Intelligence”, facial recognition systems are under scrutiny. Class imbalance is a leading issue in facial recognition software. A dataset called "Faces in the Wild," considered the benchmark for testing facial recognition software, had data that was 70% male and 80% white. Although it might be good enough to be used on lower-quality pictures, "in the wild" is a highly debatable topic.

Apart from algorithms and data, researchers and engineers developing any system are also responsible for bias. According to VentureBeat, a Columbia University study found that "the more homogenous the [engineering] team is, the more likely it is that a given prediction error will appear." This can create a lack of empathy for the people who face problems of discrimination, leading to an unconscious introduction of bias in these algorithmic-savvy systems.

So, how can we eliminate the negative impact of bias in the use or development of our technology? Come to this session to gain insights into this persnickety challenge.



  Date and Time

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  • Date: 19 Oct 2022
  • Time: 05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
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  • 2500 North River Rd.
  • Manchester, New Hampshire
  • United States 03106
  • Building: SETA IDE
  • Room Number: 128
  • Click here for Map

  • Contact Event Hosts
  • Starts 12 October 2022 07:59 AM
  • Ends 19 October 2022 07:59 AM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Topic:

Eliminating Bias from Technology for Developers

Abstract:  As reported in the Forbes article “The Role Of Bias In Artificial Intelligence”, facial recognition systems are under scrutiny. Class imbalance is a leading issue in facial recognition software. A dataset called "Faces in the Wild," considered the benchmark for testing facial recognition software, had data that was 70% male and 80% white. Although it might be good enough to be used on lower-quality pictures, "in the wild" is a highly debatable topic.

Apart from algorithms and data, researchers and engineers developing any system are also responsible for bias. According to VentureBeat, a Columbia University study found that "the more homogenous the [engineering] team is, the more likely it is that a given prediction error will appear." This can create a lack of empathy for the people who face problems of discrimination, leading to an unconscious introduction of bias in these algorithmic-savvy systems.

So, how can we eliminate the negative impact of bias in the use or development of our technology? Come to this session to gain insights into this persnickety challenge.

Biography:

    Biography for James McKim, PMP, ITIL

 

 

James McKim is Managing Partner at Organizational Ignition. Over his 30+ year career, he has helped small and large organizations in many industries to spark efficiency and growth through the aligning of people, process, and technology. He excels at bridging business and technology. He has a well-known knack for quickly assessing the “big picture” of a situation, identifying Critical Success Factors, prioritizing solutions, and bringing a project management disciplined approach to facilitating organizational improvements. Recognized by organizations such as Atd, Brandon Hall, Bersin Associates, Axelos, PMI, and the Diversity Workforce Council he is dedicated to creating win-win situations between organizations and their employees. He was named in 2021 as one of New Hampshire’s Top 200 Business Leaders.

 

Mr. McKim has a deep understanding of current trends in the development, selection, deployment, and revenue realization of human and technology capital. He has played diverse roles including Developer, Trainer, Facilitator, Consultant, Director, Adjunct Professor, CIO/CTO, and President for organizations such as Digital Equipment Corp, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and FIRST. He has, also, co-founded several companies ranging from a management consulting firm that specialized in facilitating strategic use of information through both non-human and human means to a provider of asset tracking products & services.

 

Mr. McKim is well-versed in the impact of public policy on organizations and individuals. He has served as Chair of the Software Association of New Hampshire, Chair of the Education Committee of NH Public Broadcasting, member of the NH International Trade Advisory Board and advisor to governors and legislators. He now serves a consultant, facilitator, frequent conference presenter, and guest on radio and television shows focusing on the topic of organizational performance through diversity.

 

Mr. McKim believes strongly in giving back to the community. He is Chair of the Episcopal Church’s National Executive Council Committee Anti-Racism. He serves in leadership roles on several organization Boards including the Board of Directors for New Hampshire Public Broadcasting, PMI NH, and Manchester Branch of the NAACP.

 

Mr. McKim lives in Goffstown, New Hampshire with his wife Nancy and daughter Katherine where he is an avid tennis player, cross-country skier, and digs singing vocals in the jazz band the Episcocats.