Advances in measuring, modeling, and understanding the consequences of climate change on snow hydrology

#remote #imaging #sensing #ice #geoscience
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Climate warming is impacting mountain snowpacks in ways that challenge water resources management and climate prediction. New developments in remote sensing and modeling are advancing our abilities to characterize complex relationships, especially in mountainous and forested regions where snow observations are especially challenging. Integration of observations and models fill gaps, mitigating the limitations of each approach. Ultimately, we need to consider the role that snow plays within the hydrologic cycle and as part of a social-ecological system. This presentation takes a wide-ranging view of changing snowpacks, changing technologies, and changing perspectives on the role of snow in our society writ large. 



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  • Date: 14 Feb 2024
  • Time: 03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
  • All times are (UTC-05:00) Eastern Time (US & Canada)
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Virtual Link:  https://rit.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAvc-uorDotGNWocff7lngIzxhPmjLUei-d

  • Rochester Institute of Technology
  • 54 Lomb Memorial Drive
  • Rochester, New York
  • United States 14623
  • Building: Center for Imaging Science
  • Room Number: Auditorium

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  Speakers

Dr. Anne Nolin Dr. Anne Nolin of University of Nevada

Topic:

Advances in measuring, modeling, and understanding the consequences of climate change on snow hydrology

Climate warming is impacting mountain snowpacks in ways that challenge water resources management and climate prediction. New developments in remote sensing and modeling are advancing our abilities to characterize complex relationships, especially in mountainous and forested regions where snow observations are especially challenging. Integration of observations and models fill gaps, mitigating the limitations of each approach. Ultimately, we need to consider the role that snow plays within the hydrologic cycle and as part of a social-ecological system. This presentation takes a wide-ranging view of changing snowpacks, changing technologies, and changing perspectives on the role of snow in our society writ large. 

Biography:

Dr. Anne Nolin is a hydrologist and mountain geographer with over three decades of experience in snow hydrology, climatology, and remote sensing. She has an M.S. in Soils, Water, and Engineering from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of California-Santa Barbara. After receiving her doctorate, Anne worked at the University of Colorado, Boulder spending time on the Greenland Ice Sheet and the Colorado Rockies. She served on the Geography faculty at Oregon State University from 2003-2018 and is now at the University of Nevada, Reno. Currently, Nolin and her students use field measurements, airborne and satellite remote sensing, and computer simulations to understand how wildfires are changing the hydrology of snowy watersheds from the Sierra Nevada to Alaska.

Email:

Address:University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia St, Reno, NV, Reno, United States, 89557





Agenda

Talk followed by coffee and cookies