Artificial Intelligence and Humanoid-Robot Athletes

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The mission of IEEE Women in Engineering (WIE) group is to inspire and empower female Engineers and Scientists. With this technical seminar on Robotics, we aim to spark an interest in graduate and undergraduate students in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. Speaker of the event will talk about humanoid robots with athletic capabilities and more interestingly female athletic robots (e.g. Jennifer and Clara) developed in Autonomous Agents Laboratory at University of Manitoba. The talk will be followd by demonstration of robots functionality. 



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • University of Manitoba
  • Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • Canada R3T 2N2
  • Building: EITC (Engineering building)
  • Room Number: E3-262(Senate Chamber)
  • Click here for Map
  • Starts 08 November 2016 12:00 AM
  • Ends 21 November 2016 01:30 PM
  • All times are Canada/Central
  • No Admission Charge
  • Register


  Speakers

Mr. Amir Hosseinmemar of Autonomous Agent laboratory (AALab), University of Manitoba

Topic:

Artificial Intelligence and Humanoid-Robot Athletes

In the growing world of technology, humanoid robotics has emerged as one of the fastest evolving fields. As a human when we play a soccer game, a basketball game, jogging or climbing, we are doing tasks that are easy for the human brain to understand. We do not think about solutions such as solving for the x, y, z positions of each individual joint or how to calculate the angular velocity of each particular joint. Similarly, when we walk, we do not think about the parameters of each individual joint, we instead decide about walking pace and stride. However, no existing humanoid robot can do any of these tasks as well as humans. Moving and controlling balance is a very simple task for humans but for a biped robot controlling balance and motion is a very complicated and expensive task. In order to advance the state of the art, fully autonomous humanoid-robots that use artificial intelligence need to be examined against solid benchmarks so that current abilities can be measured and so that goals can be set and progress charted. One means of setting such benchmarks is through robotics competitions: researchers around the world can compete against each other in real time, and share their ideas and solu​tions.​ HuroCup is a benchmark competition that is recognized worldwide and has been growing since 2002. It consists of many different sporting events such as weightlifting, basketball, etc. RoboCup is another benchmark with the focus on playing soccer. The elements of artificial intelligence and control in these tasks are all important components in broader applications for humanoids (e.g. rescue, household robots) In this seminar, speaker will talk about AALab's work on Hurocup and RoboCup challenges in recent years and how these two benchmarks lead researchers to improve artificial intelligence and robotics.

Biography:

Mr. Hosseinmemar is currently a PhD candidate in computer science program, at University of Manitoba. He received M.Sc. in computer science, B.Sc. (honors) in computer science, and diploma in electronic. He is in third year working with the successful group in Autonomous Agent laboratory (AALab). His research is on active balancing of humanoid robots and push recovery and artificial intelligence under supervision of prof. Jacky Baltes and Co-supervision of prof. John Anderson. He is the leader of the teen size humanoid team. The kid size and teen size robotic teams of the group have won many prices over years.

Address:University of Manitoba, , Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, R3T2N2

Mr. Amir Hosseinmemar of Autonomous Agent laboratory (AALab), University of Manitoba

Topic:

Artificial Intelligence and Humanoid-Robot Athletes

Biography:

Address:Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada