Designing an Optimal Waveform for Active Sonar using Multi-Tone Sinusoidal Frequency Modulation (MTSFM)

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The performance of active sonar could be greatly enhanced by automation in the selection of transmit waveform type and receiver processing. Although the bandwidth of deployed systems allows for the transmission of numerous waveform types of various frequencies nearly simultaneously, this capability is underutilized as the optimal waveform combination is a complex function of a number of parameters including the environment, target type, and system objectives/priorities. Such a problem may not be optimally solved using a suite of existing waveforms but rather by designing an optimal waveform for the current scenario. Over the past 60 years there has been a wealth of research in choosing the optimal waveform to transmit for radar/sonar systems. Efforts in the published literature have largely focused on designing waveforms that possess a desired Ambiguity Function (AF), Auto-Correlation Function (ACF), or Cross-Correlation Function (CCF) [Wilcox: Math. Res. Center Rpt. 157 (1960), Li et al : Camb. Univ. Press (2012)]. Waveforms for active sonar must additionally be well suited for transmission on piezoelectric transducers. This typically requires the waveform to possess a constant amplitude and high Spectral Efficiency (SE) where the vast majority of the waveform's energy is contained in the band of operational frequencies. This research explores this challenging design problem for active sonar using Multi-Tone Sinusoidal Frequency Modulation (MTSFM). The MTSFM waveform’s modulation function is a finite sum of weighted sinusoidal functions expressed as a Fourier series. The Fourier coefficients act as a tunable set of parameters that may be adjusted to synthesize a waveform with desired AF/ACF shapes. Utilizing a finite number of Fourier coefficients produces a modulation function that is smooth and continuous in time which results in a waveform with high SE. Simulations demonstrate that the MTSFM waveform’s design coefficients can be adjusted to finely control the waveform’s performance characteristics while maintaining the constant amplitude and high SE properties necessary for transmission on practical piezoelectric devices.



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  • McGoverns On The Water
  • 310 Shove Street
  • Fall River, Massachusetts
  • United States 02724
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  • Starts 10 October 2017 12:00 AM
  • Ends 16 November 2017 06:00 PM
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  Speakers

David Hague

David Hague of Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Topic:

Designing an Optimal Waveform for Active Sonar using Multi-Tone Sinusoidal Frequency Modulation (MTSFM).

Biography:

David A. Hague received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA, USA, in 2005, 2012, and 2015, respectively. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and did tours of duty in Afghanistan in 2002 and Kosovo in 2006. From the end of 2006 until August 2009, he worked for Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Tewksbury, MA, USA, where he developed signal processing software for a variety of radar systems. He returned to UMass Dartmouth in the fall of 2009 as a Research Assistant at the Acoustic Signal Processing Laboratory run by Dr. John R. Buck to pursue graduate study with a concentration in acoustic signal processing. Dr. Hague received the Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation (SMART) program scholarship in 2010 and 2011 to pursue his graduate studies. As part of his scholarship experience, David interned at NUWC under the mentorship of Dr. Mary H. Johnson and Dr. Tod Luginbuhl during the summers from 2010-2014. David joined NUWC as a full-time employee in Dr. Johnson’s branch in September of 2015 conducting research on a variety of active sonar projects. His main research interests are in radar/sonar signal processing, time/frequency analysis, waveform design, and compressive sensing. He is a member of the Acoustical Society of America and the IEEE Signal Processing Society and has served on the technical committee for the 2017 IEEE Underwater Acoustic Signal Processing Workshop.

David Hague of Naval Undersea Warfare Center

Topic:

Designing an Optimal Waveform for Active Sonar using Multi-Tone Sinusoidal Frequency Modulation (MTSFM).

Biography:





Agenda

Social hour 5:30 PM followed by dinner at 6:00 PM and talk at 7:00 PM