Extracting the Full Potential of Wide-Bandgap Power Semiconductors

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Talk by Prof. Christina DiMarino from Virginia Tech, CPES, USA


The superior material properties of wide-bandgap (WBG) power semiconductors enable them to switch faster, block higher voltages, have higher current densities, and operate in harsh environments. With these features, WBG power semiconductors have the potential to advance a number of application areas. Such areas include electrified transportation systems, wind and solar, medium-voltage drives, and advanced distribution systems. However, the high- speed, high-voltage, high-density, and high-temperature benefits of these unique switches are also the primary challenges. The high-speed switching causes significant electromagnetic interference, the high-voltage ratings result in increased electric field strength, the high current density produces high heat flux, and the high-temperature capability reduces the reliability of the surrounding components. Present power module packages are unable to address these challenges, and, as a result, are limiting the performance of these high-performance switches. New techniques and materials are needed to develop packages that will enable the full potential of these WBG devices to shine through. This presentation will provide an overview of the major challenges associated with packaging WBG power semiconductors, and methods to overcome these barriers.



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  • Date: 02 Dec 2019
  • Time: 10:15 AM to 11:00 AM
  • All times are Europe/Zurich
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  • EPFL STI IEL PEL
  • Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Switzerland 1015
  • Building: ELH
  • Room Number: 114
  • Prof. Drazen Dujic

    Power Electronics Laboratory

    EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland



  Speakers

Prof. Christina DiMarino

Topic:

Extracting the Full Potential of Wide-Bandgap Power Semiconductors

The superior material properties of wide-bandgap (WBG) power semiconductors enable them to switch faster, block higher voltages, have higher current densities, and operate in harsh environments. With these features, WBG power semiconductors have the potential to advance a number of application areas. Such areas include electrified transportation systems, wind and solar, medium-voltage drives, and advanced distribution systems. However, the high- speed, high-voltage, high-density, and high-temperature benefits of these unique switches are also the primary challenges. The high-speed switching causes significant electromagnetic interference, the high-voltage ratings result in increased electric field strength, the high current density produces high heat flux, and the high-temperature capability reduces the reliability of the surrounding components. Present power module packages are unable to address these challenges, and, as a result, are limiting the performance of these high-performance switches. New techniques and materials are needed to develop packages that will enable the full potential of these WBG devices to shine through. This presentation will provide an overview of the major challenges associated with packaging WBG power semiconductors, and methods to overcome these barriers.

Biography:

Christina DiMarino is an assistant professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech in the Washington, D.C. metro area in the United States. She joined the Center for Power Electronics Systems (CPES) at Virginia Tech in 2012 as a direct Ph.D. student. In 2014, she received her Master of Science degree in electrical engineering at CPES for her work on the high-temperature characterization and modeling of silicon carbide transistors. In 2018, she received her Ph.D. degree at CPES on the packaging of 10 kV silicon carbide power MOSFETs.

She is a member of the IEEE Power Electronics Society, IEEE Industry Applications Society, and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). She is the co-chair of the IEEE Power Electronics Society Young Professionals committee, and an executive secretary for the IEEE International Technology Roadmap for Wide Bandgap Power Semiconductors (ITRW). She has received five best paper and presentation awards, and authored and co-authored more than 30 publications in peer-reviewed journals and IEEE conferences.