Quantum Imaging: Advantages, Progress, and Future Challenges

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Quantum mechanically entangled light particles break down the boundaries of conventional optics and bring about new possibilities for imaging techniques called quantum imaging. Quantum imaging is a new sub-field of quantum optics that image objects with a resolution or other imaging criteria beyond what is possible in classical optics. Unearthing these possibilities and creating technological solutions is the goal here. We are glad to host Dr. Markus Gräfe, head of the Quantum-Enhanced Imaging group at Fraunhofer IOF in Germany, to learn more about quantum imaging, his remarkable progress, and the future of this field. Join us virtually via Zoom on Mar 23 at 12 pm EDT.



  Date and Time

  Location

  Hosts

  Registration



  • Date: 23 Mar 2022
  • Time: 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) Canada/Eastern
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IEEE Montreal Section is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83497370399?pwd=R2ZCSHdCNk4zcGJWaVVyRGJQNmQ3UT09

Meeting ID: 834 9737 0399
Passcode: 084460

  • Starts 11 March 2022 02:52 PM
  • Ends 23 March 2022 12:00 PM
  • All times are (GMT-05:00) Canada/Eastern
  • No Admission Charge


  Speakers

Dr. Markus Gräfe Dr. Markus Gräfe

Dr. Markus Gräfe finished his Ph.D. in integrated quantum photonics at the Institute of Applied Physics in Jena, Germany, in 2017. He was awarded the Applied Photonics Award for his outstanding contributions in photonic quantum walks (STIFT Förderpreis). He is a group leader at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF for "Quantum-Enhanced Imaging" and related quantum photonics areas within the Emerging Technologies Department. His research topics include:

  • Quantum imaging and sensing with undetected photons
  • Microscopy with non-classical states of light
  • Photon-pair and multiphoton source development
  • Quantum walks of correlated photon pairs and multiphoton states
  • Entropy sources and quantum random number generation